Public Art in Outdoor Spaces, Part II

I’ve encountered a variety of interesting art pieces in landscape settings ranging from urban to natural. Some are in parks and nature preserves, others are along city streets and alleys, and a few are in small town centers. Some integrate visually and thematically with their surroundings, and others stand alone. Below are a few favorites.

1 - Art on the High Line 1
Cut-outs in a small panel (viewed through a scope) on New York City’s High Line transform this view of buildings into abstract shapes.

2 - Art on the High Line 2
More art on the High Line: A modernistic wire structure with houses and seed/fruit trays for birds and insects seems to represent the intersection of city and nature, as does much of the High Line. A similar structure faces the opposite direction on the other side of the walkway.

3 - Garden in the Woods
These transparent facial profiles at Garden in the Woods in Framingham, Massachusetts, appear to symbolize the connection between people and nature.

4 - MSU art museum
Juxtaposition of “natural” and built forms – Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University in East Lansing

5 - Felice Varini - New Haven
Painted optical illusion in New Haven, Connecticut, by Felice Varini – this shape is only visible when one stands at a specific point. As one progresses further down the alley, it no longer appears as four circles within a square.

6 - Cambridge granite sculpture
Sculpture composed of various types of stone in Cambridge, Massachusetts

7 - Sculpture in Eastport ME
Granite sculpture in Eastport, Maine – a town whose principal industry is commercial fishing

8 - CityGarden bas-relief
Bas-relief piece in CityGarden – a sculpture park in St. Louis, Missouri

9 - Sculpture in Montreal
A deep discussion taking place in Montreal, Quebec

10 - Belfast ME bench
Colorful bench in Belfast, Maine

11 - SLCH healing garden
Whimsical piece in the Olson Family Garden at St. Louis Children’s Hospital

See also Public Art in Outdoor Spaces (Part 1)

Photos by Alice Webb

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2 thoughts on “Public Art in Outdoor Spaces, Part II

  1. I appreciated your blog about the description of what a landscape architect is, yet I find it curious that you don’t give credit to the landscape architects associated with any of the sculpture projects above as a further means of educating the public as to what we do.

    Travis Pryor, ASLA
    Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island Licensed Landscape Architect

    1. In this case, if I mentioned the landscape architects, I would have also had to credit the artists who created these pieces. Not all this info is available online, and takes a fair amount of time to research (for which I don’t get paid). Furthermore, only about half of the pieces shown above are included in settings that were designed by landscape architects. Also, please keep in mind that this blog is not only about projects designed by landscape architects, but about related design topics. This post really falls within the latter category.

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