Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Architecture’ Category

LDS center 1

While in search of interesting examples of landscape architecture in Salt Lake City last spring, I came across a building and site with an unusual juxtaposition of formal and naturalistic design. The LDS Conference Center includes two sides that were designed to represent a mountainside, dominated by a series of terraces with coniferous trees. The other two sides of this massive edifice, however, are quite formal in design, with a prominent tower from which a water cascade falls to the street level below. The roof landscape also features this peculiar blending of nature and structure. It’s almost as if vegetation were taking over the building from the east and north sides. Many parts of this design are quite attractive, but I’m not so sure that the scheme works as a whole.

 

LDS center 2
LDS Conference Center (view from south) – The vast and stark hardscapes of the roof and entry plaza contrast with the naturalistic planting design of the roof’s large meadow and trees.

 

LDS center 3
LDS Conference Center (view from northeast), showing the planted terraces

 

LDS center 4   LDS center 5
Formally-designed elements of the building and landscape include a tower with a water cascade that falls down to the street level, and reflecting pools on the roof.

 

LDS center 6
Up on the roof: One in a series of formal water features with a naturalistic landscape beyond

 

LDS center 7
Tower view on the roof

 

LDS center 8
The roof includes an expansive meadow with a view of the distant mountains

 

LDS center 9
Northeast corner of the building with trees on terraces, suggesting a mountainside
 
Aerial images obtained from Google Earth; all other photos by Alice Webb

Read Full Post »

Straying once again from the subject of landscape architecture, I am posting some photos of my favorite style of historic architecture. Art Deco buildings are not very common in the northeastern U.S., and I always get excited when I see a well-designed structure in this style, especially those with interesting details. Below are a few examples I’ve photographed during the last couple of years. Also, you can check out more on this subject in two of my previous posts: Miami Beach Art Deco and Art Deco in New York City.
 
A - 111 Eighth Avenue NYC
111 Eighth Avenue building, New York City
 
B - American Radiator Bldg. NYC
American Radiator building, New York City
 
F - Film Center NYC
Film Center building, New York City
 
E - Higgins Armory Building, Worcester MA
Higgins Armory building (former museum), Worcester, MA
 
D - Empire Diner NYC
Empire Diner, New York City
 
G - Grand theater, Ellsworth ME
Grand Theater, Ellsworth, ME
 
H - Greenwich Substation NYC
Greenwich Substation, New York City
 
I - NET&T bldg in Worcester MA
New England Telephone and Telegraph Co. building, Worcester, MA
 
C - Coca cola bldg in Worcester MA
Coca Cola building (former bottling plant), Worcester, MA
 
J - Salvation Army Bldg. 1 NYC
Salvation Army building, New York City
 
K - Salvation Army Bldg. 2 NYC
Salvation Army building, New York City
 
L - Starrett-Lehigh Bldg. NYC
Starrett-Lehigh building, New York City
 
Photos by Alice Webb, except Higgins Armory building photo (obtained from Wikimedia Commons, and cropped).

Read Full Post »

Since we’re in the depths of winter here in the northern U.S., I’m sharing some photos of art deco buildings in Miami Beach, in happy pastel colors to help melt away the cold weather blues! I’ve always been a fan of this style of historic architecture, and am happy to see these buildings so well-preserved. For more on this topic, check out my post on art deco in New York City.

 

Deco district (1024x687) (2)

 

Avalon (728x1024)

 

Barbizon (1024x768)

 

Berkeley Shore (1024x796)

 

Blue & purple bldg (1024x669)

 

Boat-like hotel (1024x588)

 

Breakwater (683x1024)

 

Cavalier (1024x724)

 

Colony (683x1024)

 

Deco detail (1024x572)

 

Delano (1024x727)

 

Loews (683x1024)

 

Marlin (683x1024)

 

McAlpin (794x1024)

 

Park Central 3 (1024x667)

 

Starlite (683x1024)

 

Waldorf Towers (890x1024)

 

Winter Haven 2 (683x1024)
 
Photos by Alice Webb

Read Full Post »

Green roofs have important environmental and economic benefits, which include reducing stormwater runoff, cooling urban air temperatures, improving air quality, and reducing energy usage in buildings. Another positive outcome that I hadn’t given much thought to, until this week, is the wildlife habitat that green roofs create. This roof (below) in Boston supports a nesting gull, standing over its brood of chicks. Who could ask for a better home, with such great views of the city and harbor?

 

Green Roof in Boston

 

Photo by Alice Webb

Read Full Post »

I know this is a bit off the topic of landscape architecture, but I happen to have a love for Art Deco design, and want to share some photos of this subject that I took in New York City last year. My grandfather was an architect when this style was very popular; in fact, he was one of many architects who designed the Rockefeller Center complex of buildings when he was employed by Raymond Hood.

 


Looking south on Lexington Avenue: G.E. Building in foreground on right, and Chrysler Building in background

 


Detail of Chanin Building on Lexington Avenue

 


G.E. Building on Lexington Avenue

 


Madison Belmont Building detail (on Madison Avenue)

 


Lexington Avenue entrance to the Chrysler Building

 


Lobby of Empire State Building

 


Rockefeller Center detail

 


Rockefeller Center detail

Photos by Alice Webb

Read Full Post »